Italy by Rail (Part 4: Venice)

IMG_1193I leap at any opportunity to share my love of Venice, one of my favourite places to be, so I’m excited to be writing this post and sharing some of my top picks!

Nothing can prepare you for the breathtaking sight that greets you as you leave the train station and find yourself on the edge of the Grand Canal. For me, this beats arriving by water-taxi or speedboat hands down. It is like entering another world – and one that you’ll be very reluctant to say goodbye to when the time comes.

Venice itself is pretty small, and if you like to tick off the sights, you’ll be able to do this easily, without much need for public transport. However, Venice is also the perfect place to just BE. So take a vaporetto (water bus) for no reason – if you’re under 29, the ‘Rolling Venice’ card and 3-day young persons’ travel card are a bargain! – island-hop with hoards of tourists, and find your own little piece of paradise. Enjoy navigating the intricate network of narrow streets, and the joy of leaving a busy tourist hot-spot and finding yourself in an isolated square within seconds.

I’ve been lucky to visit Venice 3 times in the past few years, but I still get a thrill from a ride in the gondola (made less romantic by the tourists snapping away at you as you go by, but with a charm of it’s own, and offering a unique perspective of Venice), and scoffing gelato in St Mark’s Square. However, my heart lies with the islands in the Venetian Lagoon, and the peace you find in the evenings when the vaporetto have stopped their regular trips, and the crowds  have returned to their cruise ships and tour buses. When you’re booking your Venetian adventure, consider staying on the island of Murano. While this might mean limiting your evening meal options, or splashing out for a water taxi or late vaporetto after dinner in Venice, it’s worth it for the tranquil feeling that you are the only people left on the island at night, and waking to watch the locals go about their daily business – this might sound obvious, but literally everything happens by boat; rubbish collection, fruit and veg sales, construction… it’s an awesome insight into island life! Last time I visited Venice, The Boy and I opted for pure luxury after 10 days of hostels, and booked 3 nights at La Gare Hotel Venezia – a stunning hotel on Murano, complete with prosecco breakfasts (and a spread to make your mouth water), comfortable luxurious rooms, and a smashing restaurant.

The small islands of Burano, famous for it’s lace-making, and Murano, of glass-making fame, are nicely geared up for tourism, with plenty of photo opportunities and locally-produced souvenirs to take home, but don’t dismiss the tiny island of Torcello, in the north of the Lagoon. With a full-time population of just 10 people, including the parish priest, Torcello offers breathing space after the crowds on Burano and Murano. There is a cathedral and church that are worth checking out, and the Ponte del Diavolo (Devil’s Bridge), but the real attraction for me is Osteria Al Ponte del Diavolo. If you’re looking for a hearty but refined Italian meal, in a peaceful sunny garden, this is the perfect lunch stop. Oh and they also do wedding receptions, in case you are thinking about Italian nuptials!

Below: Pretty coloured houses in Burano, and a glass sculpture in Murano.

IMG_1283IMG_1102

I’m out of superlatives, so I guess it’s time for me to stop writing. I hope this post offers an insight into what makes Venice so special, and will encourage you to think outside the box just a little when you live your Venetian adventure.

Useful sites:

http://www.veneziaunica.it/en/content/rolling-venice

http://www.lagarehotelvenezia.com/en/

http://uk.osteriaalpontedeldiavolo.com/

IMG_1287

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s